Wednesday, April 30, 2014

Getting Started


You can’t avoid it.  If you want to get a patent, you have to do the paperwork.  Somebody will have to write an application.  And that somebody should not be you.  While individuals are permitted to represent themselves before the USPTO, don’t do it. 

You won’t be happy with the results. 

Writing, filing and prosecuting a patent application is a technical, complicated and confusing process and mistakes made early in the process can inhibit or even disqualify you from getting a patent.   You really need representation at this point in the process. 

Once you get representation they will have questions.  And to answer those questions, it helps know the components of an application:

Specifications: 

This is the heart of a patent.  The basic requirements are that it contains a description and claims.  The description should describe what the invention is, the process for making the invention, and how to use the invention.  The description should also include the “best mode” or the best way known to make and use the invention.  The claims contain specific statements of what a person must do to infringe on the patented invention.  While a specification usually has multiple claims, only one of the claims needs to be violated for the patent to be infringed on.

The expected structure of the specification also includes the title, abstracts and summaries, background information, and references to other related applications.   Program listings, gene sequences, and large data tables can be submitted in a CD format.

Drawings: 

With few exceptions, drawings of the invention will be required as part of an application. 

The major requirements are that drawings:  1) must be black and white using an India caliber ink on solid lines;  2) must be on 8 1/2” x 11” paper with empty 1” margins;  3) characters must be 1/8” tall;  4) drawings must be numbered; 5) if used, reference characters must be mentioned in the description; and, 6) if a part of an invention is shown in multiple drawings, the same reference character must be used to identify the part in each drawing. 

Drawings can be difficult because the drawing requirements are detailed and strict.  The goal of these requirements is to insure that the drawings submitted with the application are in condition to be published.  Applications are not processed by the USPTO until all the drawing requirements have been met.

Inventor’s Oath: 

Each patent applicant must complete an oath that:  1) they believe they are the first and original inventor of the invention being patented;  2) they have read and understand the application; and,  3) they understand that they have a duty to disclose all information known to be material to patentability.  In addition, they must provide in the oath their full name and country of citizenship.

Transmittal Letter and Application Data Sheet: 

The transmittal letter is a standard cover letter that is used to identify the application and to inventory the application components being filed.   The Application Data Sheet contains bibliographic information about the application including applicant names, contact information, representation information, ownership and assignment information and priority relationships to other foreign or domestic patent applications.   

Appropriate Filing Fee: 

Get used to it because the USPTO charges a separate fee for almost everything it touches.  The exact fee will depend on how the application is filed.

Below is a summary of selected patents that have been recently issued in textile related classification codes:

Impact distributing mechanism:  A series of plates interconnected to form a protective shield (like a shin guard).  Patent #:  8627512.  Inventor:  Dodd.  Assignee:   Pinwrest Development Group, Llc

Prayer breastplate:  A fabric prayer breastplate with rectangular shapes representing the twelve stones on Aaron's breastplate and have religious significance. The individual representations include at least one item supporting pocket, individually stitched panels or a single graphical depiction.  Patent:  8627513.  Inventor:  Colbert.  Not Assigned

Vehicle ready modular light weight load bearing equipment apparatus:  A modular system for securing tactical equipment (weapons and volatiles) within a transport vehicle.  Patent #:  8627514.  Inventors:  Scoggins and Scoggins.  Assignee:  Spartan Tactical Concepts, LLC.

Method for determining a characteristic of a consumable:  A method of illuminating a flowing liquid at two different depths which can be used to measure physical parameters of the liquid.  Patent #:  8627526.  Inventors:  Dunsbergen, et. al.   Assignee:  Whirlpool Corporation.

Footwear customization kit:  A stand for a footwear customization kit.  The customizable portion can be deformed when heated.  The stand holds the article of footwear in a steam environment.  Patent #:  8627528.  Inventors:  Baker, et.al.  Assignee:  Nike, Inc.

Energy-return shoe system:  A spring based shoe system capable of returning impact energy to the wearer.  Patent #:  US 8627582.  Inventor:  Perenich   Not Assigned.

Energy-return shoe system:  Related to 8627582 above.  A shaft based shoe system capable of returning impact energy to the wearer.  Patent #:  US 8627583.  Inventor:  Perenich   Not Assigned.

Liquid-resistant connectors and covers for equipment using the same:  Two plates and a gasket that can be stitched to a water resistant fabric without damaging the water resistance of the fabric.  This allows heavy objects (like DSLR cameras) to be connected to the fabric.  Patent #:  8627777.  Inventor:  Strum and Murdoch.  Assignee:  Think Tank Photo, Inc.

Weaving method and loom for implementing this method:  A method for weaving a woven fabric comprising two layers connected by binding threads.    Patent #:  8627855.  Inventor:  Deschamps.  Assignee:  Ets A. Deschamps Et Fils


Jim Carson is a principal of RB Consulting, Inc. and a registered patent agent.  He has over 30 years of experience across multiple industries including the biotechnology, textile, computer, telecommunications, and energy sectors.  RB Consulting, Inc. specializes in providing management, prototyping, and regulatory services to small and start-up businesses.  He can be reached via email at James.Carson.Jr@gmail.com or by phone at (803) 792-2183.

Happy May Day

Agathon Associates extends May Day greetings to readers in nations that celebrate May 1st as a public holiday.

FXR Factory Racing Recalls Children’s Outerwear Due to Strangulation Hazard

Name of product: FXR Factory Racing Children’s jackets and hoodies

Hazard: Drawstrings can become entangled or caught on playground slides, hand rails, school bus doors or other moving objects, posing a significant strangulation and/or entanglement hazard to children. In February 1996, CPSC issued guidelines about drawstrings in children's upper outerwear. In 1997, those guidelines were incorporated into a voluntary standard. Then, in July 2011, based on the guidelines and voluntary standard, CPSC issued a federal regulation. CPSC's actions demonstrate a commitment to help prevent children from strangling or getting entangled on neck and waist drawstrings in upper outerwear, such as jackets and sweatshirts.

Units: About 420 in the U.S. and 34,357 in Canada.

Description: This recall involves 11 styles of FXR child/youth outerwear jackets and hoodies for both boys and girls. They come in sizes 2 through 12. The jackets and hoodies are made of polyester or a blend of cotton/polyester and they have a front zip closure with knit elastic or Velcro adjustable cuffs. A drawstring is around the neck of the jackets and hoodies. The hoodies come in a variety of color combinations; such as red, purple, grey, red/black/white, green/black, and black. The jackets come in pink/white and in solid blue and pink. The name of the recalled product is located on the content care label which is sewn into the neck area of the garment. It can be found underneath the letters FXR.

Sold at U.S. Snowmobile Dealers and on the firm’s website www.fxrracing.com between August 2008 through January 2014 for about $50 to $110.

Importer: FXR Factory Racing Inc., Oak Bluff, Manitoba, Canada.

Manufactured in China and Vietnam.

Photo and more information available at http://www.cpsc.gov/en/Recalls/2014/FXR-Factory-Racing-Recalls-Childrens-Outerwear/

Tuesday, April 29, 2014

U.S. Removes the Philippines from the Special 301 Watch List

USTR has determined to remove the Philippines from the Special 301 Watch List. The Philippines has appeared on the Watch List or Priority Watch List continuously since 1994, and was first listed in 1989. In recent years, the government has enacted a series of significant legislative and regulatory reforms to enhance the protection and enforcement of intellectual property rights in the Philippines.

Background: Pursuant to Section 182 of the Trade Act of 1974, as amended by the Omnibus Trade and Competitiveness Act of 1988 and the Uruguay Round Agreements Act (1994), under the Special 301 provisions, USTR must identify those countries that deny adequate and effective protection for intellectual property rights (IPR) or deny fair and equitable market access for persons that rely on intellectual property protection.

USTR has created a "Priority Watch List" and "Watch List" under the Special 301 provisions. A trading partner’s placement on the Priority Watch List or Watch List indicates that particular problems exist in that country or economy with respect to IPR protection, enforcement, or market access for persons relying on intellectual property. Trading partners on the Priority Watch List become the focus of increased bilateral attention concerning the problem areas.

U.S. and Italian Officials to Meet Tomorrow to Discuss T-TIP

United States Trade Representative Michael Froman is scheduled to meet Wednesday, April 30th, Carlo Calenda, Italy’s Vice Minister of Economic Development to discuss the Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership ("T-TIP"), the proposed free trade agreement between the United States and the European Union.

Dept. of Defense Contracts for Acrylic Sandbags Awarded

NYP Corp., Elizabeth, N.J., has been awarded a maximum $74,383,433 modification (P00100) exercising the first option period on a two-year base contract (SPM8E6-12-D-0007) with three one-year option periods for acrylic sandbags. This is a fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment contract. Location of performance is New Jersey with a May 24, 2015 performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2014 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pa.

Dayton Bag and Burlap, Dayton, Ohio, has been awarded a maximum $74,098,240 modification (P00101) exercising the first option period on a two-year base contract (SPM8E6-12-D-0005) with three one-year option periods for acrylic sandbags. This is a fixed-price with economic-price-adjustment contract. Location of performance is Ohio with a May 24, 2015 performance completion date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2014 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pa.

Monday, April 28, 2014

International Trade Commission Reports on U.S. -Africa Apparel Trade Preference Program Performance

Benefits under the African Growth and Opportunity Act (AGOA) resulted in increased U.S. imports of automobiles, refined petroleum products, and apparel from AGOA countries during 2001-2013, reports the U.S. International Trade Commission in its publication AGOA: Trade and Investment Performance Overview.

The report found that AGOA’s impact on foreign direct investment (FDI) has been strongest in the apparel industry.

Although it is difficult to quantify AGOA’s direct and indirect effects on FDI trends, the program’s trade benefits and eligibility criteria appear to have motivated SSA countries, particularly AGOA beneficiary countries, to improve their business and investment climates. Moreover, AGOA has had a positive impact on FDI inflows, particularly in the textile and apparel sector in Kenya, Lesotho, Mauritius, Swaziland, and Botswana, and also in South Africa’s automotive industry. However, observers have noted that the uncertainties associated with the short-term renewals of the program, and the changing eligibility of particular AGOA beneficiary countries, have limited AGOA’s impact in attracting new investment to SSA.

The largest categories of U.S. apparel imports under AGOA in 2013 were “bottoms,” including men’s trousers. Roughly two-thirds of total U.S. apparel imports under AGOA were cotton products. Lesotho, Kenya, Mauritius, and Swaziland accounted for the vast majority of all U.S. imports under AGOA in 2013. The NTR rates of duty for these goods range from 2.6 to 32 percent ad valorem.

United States Keeps In Place Labor Case Against Guatemala

The United States Trade Representative Michael Froman has announced that the dispute settlement process in the 2011 labor enforcement case brought under the Dominican Republic-Central America-United States Free Trade Agreement (CAFTA-DR) will not be terminated and will remain suspended for an additional four months as the United States seeks further progress by Guatemala on its labor obligations under the CAFTA-DR.

On April 26, 2013, the United States and Guatemala signed an 18-point Enforcement Plan outlining concrete actions to strengthen labor law enforcement in Guatemala. Guatemala still needs to pass legislation providing for an expedited process to sanction employers that violate labor laws and to implement a mechanism to ensure payments to workers in cases where enterprises have closed, among other steps that remain to be taken. In addition, in the next four months, Guatemala will need to demonstrate that the legal reforms it has undertaken and still needs to undertake are being effectively implemented and leading to positive changes on the ground. The U.S. Government retains the right to reactivate the arbitral panel at any point during the next four months.

Friday, April 25, 2014

Runway Global Recalls Sugarfly Girls’ Coats; Waist Drawstring Poses Entanglement Hazard

Units: About 1,700

Description: This recall involves girl’s “Sugarfly” brand peacoat. The double breasted wool and polyester garment comes with a waist drawstring sewn into the outside seam of the garment. The coats come in three different colors; solid black, charcoal plaid and purple plaid. The coats were sold in girls’ sizes S (7-8), M (10-12), L (14), and XL (16). Style number KEM236 is located on the label found inside on the side seam of the garment. “Sugarfly” is printed on a label sewn into the neck of the coat.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported.

Remedy: Consumers should immediately detach the tie from the side seams of the coat to eliminate the hazard, or return the coat to the place of purchase for a full refund.

Sold at Nordstrom Rack nationwide from October 2010 through November 2010 and on-line at www.Zulily.com from September 2013 through November 2013 for about $40.

Importer: Runway Global, of New York, N.Y.

Manufactured in China

Thursday, April 24, 2014

Next Week Expect Updates from IWTO in Cape Town

The week of April 27th David Trumbull, Principal, Agathon Associates, will be in beautiful Cape Town, South Africa, to attend the International Wool Textile Organisation 83rd Congress

Special Greetings on Friday, April 25th, to Our Readers in Australia, Italy, and New Zealand

April 25th is Italy's Liberation Day (Festa della Liberazione), a national Italian holiday commemorating the end of the second world war and the end of Nazi occupation of the country.

April 25th is also Anzac Day, a national day of remembrance in Australia and New Zealand that broadly commemorates all Australians and New Zealanders who served and died in all wars, conflicts, and peacekeeping operations.

Certain Cashere Yarn Added to U.S.-Korea FTA Short Supply List

Effective Date: April 24, 2014, The Committee for the Implementation of Textile Agreements ("CITA") has determined that certain cashmere yarns, as specified below, are not available in commercial quantities in a timely manner in the United States. The product will be added to the list in Annex 4-B-1 of the U.S.-Korea Free Trade Agreement ("KORUS") in unrestricted quantities.

Specifications

Certain Cashmere Yarns

HTS 5108.10 & 5108.20

100% cashmere 2-ply yarns

Denier and length of staple (the figures below include the +/- 10% variance that may occur after knitting, weaving and finishing)

Yarn Sizes:

Weaving Count (single yarn): 22.86-27.94 nm (13.5-16.5 Ne), 25.2-33mm

Knitting Count (two plied): 39.62-48.43 nm (23.4-28.626 Ne), 30.6-37.4mm

Yarn sizes were calculated using a conversion factor of Ne x 1.69336 = Nm

Put up: Cone type packages.

BACKGROUND: On March 18, 2014, the Chairman of CITA received a Request for a commercial availability determination from Kingery, Samet & Sorini PLLC on behalf of Heritage Cashmere Korea Co., Ltd., for certain cashmere yarns as specified above. The due diligence statement accompanying the petition shows an exhaustive attempt to locate potential U.S. producers of this yarn (Agathon Associates assisted with background information on the domestic U.S. wool spinning industry). CITA opened a comment period for interested entities to submit offers to supply the yarn. No interested entity submitted a Response to the Request advising CITA of its objection to the Request with an offer to supply the subject product.

The KORUS rule of origin for wool and specialty wools such as cashmere is "yarn forward" meaning that a garment made in Korea may enter the U.S. duty-free under KORUS provided that all processing, from the spinning of the yarn through the final garment take place in the U.S. and/or Korea. Today's ruling by CITA means that, in the case of yarn of 100% cashmere of the specifications above, the yarn forward rule no longer will apply in KORUS.

U.S. Government Statement on the Anniversary of Rana Plaza Building Collapse in Bangladesh

The text of the following statement was released April 23, 2014, by the Department of State, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative, the U.S. Agency for International Development, and the Department of Labor.

Begin Text:

Today marks the one-year anniversary of the building collapse at Rana Plaza in Dhaka, Bangladesh that claimed over 1,100 lives and injured thousands more – the worst industrial disaster in the history of the garment industry. Like the Triangle Shirtwaist disaster in the United States over one hundred years ago, Rana Plaza, and the Tazreen factory fire that preceded it in November 2012, have become potent symbols of the significant and unnecessary risks that many workers are still forced to take in order to earn a living and support their families. As we mourn the victims, we are again called to action so that tragedies like Rana Plaza and Tazreen never happen again.

All stakeholders in Bangladesh – including the government, employers, and buyers of Bangladeshi products – bear a responsibility for ensuring safe working conditions and that workers have a voice to protect their interests. To that end, we are working with all stakeholders to implement the Action Plan we laid out after President Obama suspended Bangladesh’s benefits under the Generalized System of Preferences program last June. We are also closely coordinating with the European Union and the International Labor Organization (ILO), key partners in a July 2013 Sustainability Compact on worker rights and factory safety in Bangladesh.

In the last year, the government of Bangladesh has made progress in some important respects. For example, Bangladesh has allowed over 140 unions to register, permitted re-registration of a leading labor rights non-governmental organization that had been stripped of its registration, agreed to an ambitious plan for safety inspections and factory-level monitoring and remediation across the garment sector in collaboration with the ILO, begun the hiring of new labor inspectors, and conducted preliminary safety inspections.

But there is much more work still to be done. There continue to be concerns about basic worker rights protections under both Bangladesh’s labor law and its special Export Processing Zone law. The Bangladesh government’s hiring of inspectors is lagging, and the results of inspections need to be made publicly available on an easily accessible database. The government of Bangladesh must also do more to ensure protection when workers face intimidation and reprisals for trying to organize. Addressing these issues would help workers secure safer working conditions and better wages and enable Bangladesh to realize its full economic potential.

Wednesday, April 23, 2014

Fablok Mills combines with Milco Industries

Milco lndustries Inc., a leading supplier of knitted fabrics,announced it will be combining with Fablok Mills a quality supplier of raschel and tricot fabrics to a variety of markets in North America.

"Fablok Mills is a unique and well established company in our industry with a product line that will complement our already broad offering of quality knitted products'' states Joe lurato, Vice President of Milco Industries. "Fablok Mills has distinguished itself as a quality maker excelling in customer service and is a valued addition to our business. We believe our combined capabilities will benefit everyone in the textile supply chain."

According to a company press release "this combination will complement Milco lndustries Textile capabilities with a diversified product line targeted to automotive, health care and government end users."

More Patents



Since I am still behind on publishing the patent summaries, this week I again focus on the issued patents.

Below is a summary of selected patents that have been recently issued in textile related classification codes:

Impact distributing mechanism:  A series of plates interconnected to form a protective shield (like a shin guard).  Patent #:  8627512.  Inventor:  Dodd.  Assignee:   Pinwrest Development Group, Llc

Prayer breastplate:  A fabric prayer breastplate with rectangular shapes representing the twelve stones on Aaron's breastplate and have religious significance. The individual representations include at least one of item supporting pockets, individually stitched panels or a single graphical depiction.  Patent:  8627513.  Inventor:  Colbert.  Not Assigned

Vehicle ready modular light weight load bearing equipment apparatus:  A modular system for securing tactical equipment (weapons and volatiles) within a transport vehicle.  Patent #:  8627514.  Inventors:  Scoggins and Scoggins.  Assignee:  Spartan Tactical Concepts, LLC.

Method for determining a characteristic of a consumable:  A method of illuminating a flowing liquid at two different depths which can be used to measure physical parameters of the liquid.  Patent #:  8627526.  Inventors:  Dunsbergen, et. al.   Assignee:  Whirlpool Corporation.

Footwear customization kit:  A stand for a footwear customization kit.  The customizable portion can be deformed when heated.  The stand holds the article of footwear in a steam environment.  Patent #:  8627528.  Inventors:  Baker, et.al.  Assignee:  Nike, Inc.

Energy-return shoe system:  A spring based shoe system capable of returning impact energy to the wearer.  Patent #:  US 8627582.  Inventor:  Perenich   Not Assigned.

Energy-return shoe system:  Related to 8627582 above.  A shaft based shoe system capable of returning impact energy to the wearer.  Patent #:  US 8627583.  Inventor:  Perenich   Not Assigned.

Liquid-resistant connectors and covers for equipment using the same:  Two plates and a gasket that can be stitched to a water resistant fabric without damaging the water resistance of the fabric.  This allows heavy objects (like DSLR cameras) to be connected to the fabric.  Patent #:  8627777.  Inventor:  Strum and Murdoch.  Assignee:  Think Tank Photo, Inc.

Weaving method and loom for implementing this method:  A method for weaving a woven fabric comprising two layers connected by binding threads.    Patent #:  8627855.  Inventor:  Deschamps.  Assignee:  Ets A. Deschamps Et Fils

Flat textile structures with self-cleaning and water-repellent surface:Textile fabrics having a self cleaning and water repellent surface, constructed from an artificial, hydrophobic surface with elevations and depressions made from particles securely bonded to said base material without adhesives, resins or coatings.  Include is the method for making the fabric.  Patent #:  8629070 Inventor:  Oles and Nun.  Assignee:  Evonik Degussa Gmbh.

Disposable and reusable germ screen:  Hand covers to protect individual hands from germs while coming into physical contact with commonly used areas.  The method and devices can be either disposable or reusable.  Patent#:   8631513.  Inventor:  Sakin.  Not Assigned.

Protective element for sports pads and the like:  A protective insert of shaped thermoformable material that acts as a stiffening material inserted into protective padding.  The material returns to its original shape after an impact.    Patent #:  8631514.  Inventors:  Sioui, et.al. Assignee:  Sport Maska Inc.

Bikini top with friction locking cord adjustment system: Swim tops having a friction locking cord adjustment system with two terminal ends secured at the neck cord of the top.  Patent #:  8631515.  Inventor: Van Sisseren, et.al.  Assignee:  Nike, Inc.

Hood for protective garment:  A hood for a protective suit with improved seals for the respirator.  Patent #:  8631516.  Inventor:  Hoffman.  Assignee:  Bl├╝cher GMBH. 

Fabric fastener adjustably located between two prefabricated garment buttons:  Magnetic fastening assembly with a button face.  Intended to replace a button on a shirt or other garment. Patent #:  8631517.  Inventor:  Blakely.  Not Assigned.

Shock absorbing, stretchable fabric, head cap for receipt under a head protection helmet:  A light weight, shock absorbing, shock dissipating, moisture absorbing, stretchable fabric, head cap designed for use over the head of the user and under a hard shell helmet.  The fabric helps absorb and dissipate impact energy.  It also has a moisture wicking fabric liner.  Patent #: 8631518.  Inventor:  Jennings.  Not Assigned.

Bleaching composition:  The present invention relates to bleaching composition for keratin fibers, especially human hair, comprising at least one compound with bleaching and/or highlighting effect and a lipidic compound.  Patent:  8632609.  Inventor:  Grit.  Assignee:  Kao Germany GMBH.

Compositions for dyeing keratin fibers:  An acetal group chemical,with at least one colorant, that can be used for dyeing keratin type fibers including hair and wool. Patent #: 8632612.  Inventor:  Yontz.  Assignee:  Segetis, Inc.

Process for applying one or more treatment agents to a textile web.  An ultrasonic vibration system for textiles that uses ultrasonic vibrations to even disburse treatment agents through the material.  Patent #:  8632613.  Inventor:  Braunecker, et.al.  Assignee: Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc.

Impact-attenuation members with lateral and shear force stability and products containing such members:  An impact-attenuating member with a shear resistant member. The shear resistant members are arranged to allow bending or compression against impact forces in one direction (e.g., when landing a step or a jump), but remain highly stable against shear or lateral forces in another direction (e.g., in a side-to-side direction).  Patent #:  8631587.  Inventor:  Aveni.  Assignee:  Nike, Inc.

Footwear with a sole structure incorporating a lobed fluid-filled chamber:  A fluid-filled chamber for an article of footwear and method for manufacturing the chamber are disclosed. The chamber may be incorporated into a sole structure of the footwear and includes a central area and a lobes extending outward from the central area. The lobes are in fluid communication with the central area.  The fluid within the chamber may be air at a pressure that is approximately equal to an ambient pressure.  Patent #: 8631588.  Inventor:  Schindler, et.al.  Assignee:  Nike, Inc.

Article of footwear incorporating floating tensile strands:  A shoe with a sole structure and an upper that is connected by strands.  While not stated directly in the patent, the strands appear to be for tension and stability control.  Patent #:  8631589.  Inventor:  Dojan.  Assignee:  Nike, Inc.

Replaceable traction cleat for footwear:  A traction cleat with adjustable permitted flexure.  Adjust is made through a positional ring and rotation of the cleat.  Locking of the adjustment is done through dual locking posts.  Patent:   8631591.  Inventor:  Krikorian.  Assignee:  Pride Manufacturing Company, LLC.

Adjustable athletic positioning apparatus and applications thereof:  This patent is pretty confusing, but it appears to be a shoe sole that can be adjusted for a wearer’s specific needs.  Patent:  8631592.   Inventors: Adair and Markison.  Assignee:  Admark Athletic Ventures.

Sheet forming screen:  The invention relates to a sheet forming screen made of a multi-layer fabric as it is used in the process of papermaking in the sheet forming section of a wet end of a paper machine for draining a fiber suspension. The fabric has a longitudinal thread repeat of sixteen longitudinal threads, four longitudinal threads which are upper longitudinal threads, eight longitudinal threads which are lower longitudinal threads, and the remaining four longitudinal threads organized as two functional longitudinal thread pairs in a one and one pattern.  Patent #:  8631832.  Inventor:  Heger.  Assignee:  Andritz Technology And Asset Management Gmbh

Yoga towel:  A yoga towel comprising a first layer for standing poses made of woven nylon threads and fibers made from skin-polishing cloth, and an opposite second layer for sitting, kneeling and lying poses made of waffle-woven microfiber fabric. The yoga towel has an edge made of sailcloth. The yoga towel is constructed to prevent a participant from slipping during standing yoga poses, and the exterior remains dry to the touch during use.  Patent #:  8631833.  Inventor:  Garbarino.  Assignee:  Silver Plume, LLC.

Lyocell fiber:  A Lyocell fiber, made of material consisting of a mixture of pearl powder and ground nacre. The manufacture process uses a spinning solution of cellulose in an aqueous tertiary amine oxide (N-methylmorpholine-N-oxide (NMMO)) to spin the solution into fibers.  Patent:   8633120.  Inventors:  Firgo and Fuchs.  Assignee:  Lenzing Aktiengesellschaft






Jim Carson is a principal of RB Consulting, Inc. and a registered patent agent.  He has over 30 years of experience across multiple industries including the biotechnology, textile, computer, telecommunications, and energy sectors.  RB Consulting, Inc. specializes in providing management, prototyping, and regulatory services to small and start-up businesses.  He can be reached via email at James.Carson.Jr@gmail.com or by phone at (803) 792-2183.