Thursday, August 6, 2020

Celusuede Products Announces Acquisition of Engineered Fibers Technology

Flock producer Cellusuede Products, Inc, Rockford, Illinois, has announced it has acquired Engineered Fibers Technology, (EFT) Shelton, Connecticut. On June 30, 2020, Cellusuede completed the purchase and now has 100% interest in EFT ownership, greatly expanding Cellusuede’s capabilities as a precision short-cut fiber supplier.

EFT, founded in 1998, is an industry leader in precision short-cut technical fibers (including Ni-coated carbon, Vectran, BioMid, lyocell, S-2 glass, aramid, and PEEK, among several others) into technical markets, including specialty papers, construction and composites, as well as into thermoplastic /thermoset molding compounds, with coated (controlled strand integrity) fibers. EFT also has a well-established and unique line of wet processed fibers that includes EFTec™ Nanofibrillated fibers for filtration, wipes, and specialty papers. In addition, EFT’s offerings include its DensePakTM proprietary short fiber and packaging expertise used to manufacture obscurant devices employed by the U.S. Government as a defense against sophisticated electro-optical sensors and advanced weapon systems.

EFT is well recognized for its materials science expertise and proprietary technology for high performance technical applications. EFT’s solutions-based technical focus combined with Cellusuede’s long standing history of highest quality short-cut fibers and larger scale capacity will catapult the Company into new technical markets while entrenching the Company even further into existing markets as a first quality partner to our customer base.

Cellusuede, an ESOP company founded in 1938, will look to leverage EFT’s capabilities to grow its business in energy storage markets, automotive applications, and additive manufacturing. Andy Honkamp, President and CEO of Cellusuede, is the new President of EFT. Bob Evans, founder, and former Managing Director of EFT will stay on in a technical consulting role, and Dave Merrill, former Sales and Marketing Director for EFT, will remain in a sales and customer service support role. EFT will continue operations in Shelton, CT.

Spectro Coating Aquires Dorrie International, will be the Only Vertically Integrated Provider of Flock Tape

New England flock company Spectro Coating Corp. announces the acquisition of the assets of Dorrie International / Hicks & Otis Prints Inc. of Norwalk Connecticut. Dorrie International was a major supplier of automotive flock tape for automotive window sealing systems.

The new division will be called American Flock Tape (AFT), and will be the only vertically integrated provider of flock tape in the world. The acquisition will allow them to slit and spool to the demanding requirements of the automotive, medical, and other markets.

Spectro Coating Corp. has been in business for over 30 years under the current ownership, with roots going back more than 80 years. Claremont Flock, a division of Spectro Coating Corp. has been one of the largest flock manufacturers since 1914. We are certified ISO 9001:2015 and a Minority Owned Business.

All products are proudly Manufactured in the U S A.

Section 301 Exclusions Relating to Several Textile Articles on List 3 Extended through December 31, 2020

On August 6, 2020, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative announced that several articles on the China Section 301 List 3 which have been granted exclusions which are scheduled to expire on August 7, 2020, will continue to enjoy exclusion status through December 31, 2020. Publication in th eFederal Register will follow in a few days.

(11) 5603.12.0090

(12) 5603.14.9090

(13) 5603.92.0090

(14) 5603.93.0090

(83) Silk fabrics, containing 85 percent or more by weight of silk or of silk waste other than noil silk, the foregoing not printed, not jacquard woven, measuring over 127 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5007.20.0065)

(84) Silk fabrics, containing 85 percent or more by weight of silk or of silk waste other than noil silk, the foregoing not printed, not jacquard woven, measuring 107 cm or more but not over 127 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5007.20.0085)

(85) Yarn of cashmere or camel hair, carded but not combed, not put up for retail sale (described in statistical reporting number 5108.10.8000)

(86) Woven dyed fabrics of 100 percent textured polyester filament yarn, measuring 332.7 cm in width, weighing more than 170 g/m² (described in statistical reporting number 5407.52.2060)

(87) Woven fabric of 100 percent textured polyester filaments, dyed, weighing more than 170 g/m², measuring not more than 310 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5407.52.2060)

(88) Woven fabric of synthetic filament yarn containing 85 percent or more by weight of textured polyester filaments, dyed, measuring 249 cm in width, weighing more than 170 g/m² (described in statistical reporting number 5407.52.2060)

(89) Woven dupioni fabric wholly of non-textured dyed polyester filaments, weighing not more than 170 g/m², measuring not more than 310 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5407.61.9930)

(90) Woven fabric wholly of polyester, dyed, not flat, containing non-textured polyester filaments, weighing not more than 170 g/m², measuring not over 310 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5407.61.9930)

(91) Woven fabric wholly of polyester, dyed, containing non-textured polyester filaments, weighing more than 170 g/m², measuring not over 310 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5407.61.9935)

(92) Woven fabric containing by weight 47 percent of nylon and 53 percent of polyester, dyed, containing textured filaments, weighing not more than 170 g/m², measuring greater than 274 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5407.72.0015)

(93) Polyester filament tow, measuring more than 50 ktex but not more than 275 ktex (described in statistical reporting number 5501.20.0000)

(94) Polypropylene fiber tow, measuring more than 50 ktex but not more than 275 ktex (described in statistical reporting number 5501.40.0000)

(95) Woven dyed fabrics wholly of spun polyester, weighing more than 240 g/m² and measuring not more than 310 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5512.19.0090)

(96) Woven dyed 3-thread twill fabrics containing by weight 65 percent of polyester and 35 percent of cotton staple fibers, not napped, weighing more than 200 g/m² and exceeding 310 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5514.22.0020)

(97) Nonwoven fabrics of man-made fibers, weighing more than 25 g/m² but not more than 70 g/m², with a smooth or embossed texture (not impregnated, coated or covered with material other than or in addition to rubber, plastics, wood pulp or glass fibers), in rolls that are pre-slitted in lengths of not less than 15 cm to not more than 107 cm, for use in the manufacture of personal care wipes (described in statistical reporting number 5603.12.0090)

(98) Non-woven fabrics of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), in sheets measuring not more than 160 cm by 250 cm, weighing more than 1,800 g/m² but not more than 3,000 g/m² (described in statistical reporting number 5603.94.9090)

(99) Rugs of hand-knotted pile, of nylon and polypropylene, measuring at least 1.2 m2 (described in statistical reporting number 5701.90.1010)

(100) Rugs of 100 percent polyester or polypropylene, with brass grommets and stainless steel springs, each measuring at least 44 cm by 45 cm but not exceeding 56 cm by 59 cm (described in statistical reporting number 5705.00.2030)

(101) Woven dyed embroidery fabrics containing by weight 55 percent of polyester and 45 percent of nylon, weighing less than 115 g/m² and measuring 289 cm in width (described in statistical reporting number 5810.92.9080)

(102) Long pile knit fabrics, of acrylic pile on polyester ground, valued not over $16 per m2 (described in statistical reporting number 6001.10.2000)

(103) Knitted or crocheted fabrics of artificial staple fibers derived from bamboo (described in statistical reporting number 6003.40.6000)

Tuesday, August 4, 2020

U.S. Businesses Must Take a Stand Against China’s Human Rights Abuses

Many American brands have become household names around the globe, renowned for their exceptional quality and value. But with that visibility and consumer trust come great responsibility. American companies increasingly realize that corporate responsibility isn't just social responsibility, it is also national security. As part of this, companies must perform human rights due diligence and ask themselves tough questions to make sure their foreign deals do not, in the words of Secretary of State Pompeo, "tighten a regime's grip of repression."

To help our companies navigate this difficult landscape, the State Department and Department of Homeland Security have joined with the Departments of the Treasury and Commerce to issue a business advisory on the risks and considerations for businesses with potential supply chain exposure to entities engaged in forced labor and other human rights abuses in Xinjiang. By following this guidance, businesses can be more confident that they are not contributing to human rights abuses in China.

Read more from the U.S. Department of State.

The Brickle Group and Darlington Fabrics Among Rhode Island Textile Manufacturers Who Have Switch to Making PPE

Rhode Island’s textile companies, all members of the Rhode Island Textile Innovation Network (RITIN), immediately responded to the challenge of lack of a domestic manufacturing base for personal protection equipment, pivoting to create products and processes that were entirely new, while keeping our customers and employees safe. Read more in the Providence Journal.

Monday, August 3, 2020

CBP Issues Administrative Ruling Clarifying Use of Section 321 $800 Exemption

Section 321(a)(2)(C) of the Tariff Act of 1930, as amended, authorizes CBP to provide an administrative exemption to admit free from duty and tax shipments of merchandise (other than bona fide gifts and certain personal and household goods) imported by one person on one day having an aggregate fair retail value in the country of shipment of not more than $800. This exemption is known as a de minimis entry.

With the rise, in 2019, of the de minimis from $200 to $800 we have seen more online retailers taking advantage of it. For example, Sears has a warehouse in Canada for de minimis shipments of apparel direct to consumers in the U.S. Customs has advised online retailers that they must be careful to follow the rules for Section 321, including the "single customer on a single day" provision.

Recently CBP issued an administrative ruling that clarifies whether importations made by a nonresident importer in one day and sent to a U.S. fulfillment facility or warehouse may qualify for informal duty-free entry under 19 U.S.C. § 1321(a)(2)(c) [hereafter “Section 321”]. The administrative ruling went into effect on July 28, 2020 and was published in the Customs Rulings Online Search System (CROSS) on July 31, 2020.

Moving forward, in situations where merchandise has not been sold to a consumer at the time of importation, CBP will consider the consignee (likely the U.S. fulfillment facility or warehouse taking custody of the merchandise) to be the “person” for Section 321 eligibility purposes. The owner or the purchaser of the merchandise (likely the foreign seller) may also qualify as the “person” provided the owner or purchaser’s identity is presented to CBP. Accordingly, when the identity of the owner or purchaser of the merchandise is not presented to CBP, any affiliated shipment(s) may be subject to informal or formal entry procedures when the aggregate value exceeds the $800 limit or CBP determines it is necessary to protect the revenue or national interest.

This ruling better positions CBP to identify duty evasions and other abuses consistent with current authorities and helps create a more predictable enforcement environment for trade. This ruling also provides CBP with important foreign seller information with which to target and interdict counterfeit products, consumer safety violations, and other threats before they enter the United States.

In order for the owner or purchaser to qualify as the “person” under Section 321, importers will be required to provide the first and last name of the owner or purchaser, or the name of the business. Specifically, AMS filers must provide in the “consignee” field, the name of the owner or purchaser “in care of” the address of the domestic warehouse or fulfillment center to which the shipment is destined. Similarly, ABI filers may provide in the “ship to” and/or “buyer” fields, the name of the owner or purchaser “in care of” the address of the domestic warehouse or fulfillment center to which the shipment is destined. CBP will publish CATAIR and CAMIR updates next week.

This ruling took effect and is thereby enforceable beginning July 28, 2020. CBP intends to take near-term enforcement action against egregious violators who the agency believes are structuring their shipments to evade duty and entry requirements. Longer-term, egregious and/or repeat violators may lose their Section 321 privileges and may be required to file formal entry on subsequent shipments.

Friday, July 31, 2020

Army and Air Force Cold/Wet Weather Jacket Contract Awarded

Aurora Industries LLC, Camuy, Puerto Rico (SPE1C1-19-D-1133 (P00010), $17,203,245); and Coachys & Associates LLC, Roswell, Georgia (SPE1C1-19-D-1134 (P00004), $15,965,766), have each been awarded a modification exercising the one-year option period of a one-year base contract with one one-year option period for extreme cold/wet weather jackets. These are firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contracts under solicitation SPE1C1-18-R-0115. Locations of performance are Puerto Rico and Georgia, with a July 31, 2021, ordering period end date. Using military services are Army and Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2020 through 2021 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.