Saturday, June 12, 2021

Biden-Harris Administration Announces Supply Chain Disruptions Task Force to Address Short-Term Supply Chain Discontinuities

On June 8, 2021, the Biden-Harris Administration announced key findings from the reviews directed under Executive Order (E.O.) 14017 “America’s Supply Chains,” as well as immediate actions the Administration will take to strengthen American supply chains to promote economic security, national security, and good-paying, union jobs here at home.

The report outlines proposed actions to address:

  • domestic production of critical medicines,
  • domestic supply chain for advanced batteries,
  • sustainable domestic and international production and processing of critical minerals, and
  • semiconductor shortages.

The report also acknowledged the need to "Combat unfair trade practices."

Thursday, June 10, 2021

Army Physical Fitness Uniform Pants Contract Awarded

National Industries for the Blind, Alexandria, Virginia, has been awarded a maximum $7,575,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for physical fitness uniform pants. This is a one-year base contract with four one-year option periods. Locations of performance are North Carolina, Tennessee, and Virginia, with a June 9, 2022, ordering period end date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1-21-D-B112).

CBP Chicago Finds $552,000 of Counterfeit Items Smuggled in Passengers’ Luggage

On March 31, 2021, two passengers returning together from Turkey were asked by U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) officers if they had anything to declare. Initially, they did not declare anything, but during a secondary inspection they declared $2,000 worth of “gifts.” Officers inspected their seven large duffel bags for smuggled contraband and found an estimated MSRP value (i.e., if genuine goods) of $552,000 of counterfeit designer apparel.

More than 550 counterfeit items of varying protected trademarks were seized from the passengers, including from well-known brands like Adidas, Burberry, Chanel, Gucci, Louis Vuitton, Nike, and Versace.

Read more HERE.

Wednesday, June 9, 2021

CPSC to Participate in AATCC Webinare on Electronic Textiles, July 28, 2021

Jacqueline Campbell, Consumer Product Safety Commission Office of Hazard Identification and Reduction, will be presenting a webinar on wearable technology and integrating safety into the product design process as part of the American Association of Textile Chemists and Colorists (AATCC) webinar series on electronic textiles (e-textiles). The webinar will take place July 28, 2021 at 11:00 a.m. EDT. For additional information, contact Jacqueline Campbell at jcampbell@cpsc.gov.

Tuesday, June 8, 2021

The Market Diversification Tool Can Help Identify Potential New Export Markets

Brought to you by the Office of Textiles and Apparel (OTEXA) at the International Trade Administration, the Market Diversification Tool can help identify potential new export markets.

OTEXA is dedicated to increasing the international competitiveness of the U.S. textiles, apparel, footwear, and travel goods industries.

Based on the products you export and the markets you currently export to, the tool uses an algorithm to rank potential markets you may want to consider as future export markets.

The algorithm used to develop the ranking does three main things:

  1. Compares potential export markets to the market where you are already exporting, based on the premise that it may be easier to export to similar countries.
  2. Examines product-specific trade data to see whether potential markets are primed for more U.S. exports of the product(s) in question.
  3. Considers data that reflects whether potential export markets are generally good markets for exporting and doing business.

Secretary Blinken Indicates U.S. will not Give China Free Range with International Organizations

On June 7, 2021, in Opening Remarks Before the House Committee on Foreign Affairs, Secretary of State Antony J. Blinken hinted as a continued responses to China's attempts to dominate international organizations, stating:

"As China and others work hard to bend international organizations to their worldview, we need to ensure that these organizations instead remain grounded in the values, principles, and rules of road and rules of the world that have made our shared progress possible for so many decades."

USTR Announces, and Immediately Suspends, Tariffs in Section 301 Digital Services Taxes Investigations

On June 2, 2021, United States Trade Representative Katherine Tai announced the conclusion of the one-year Section 301 investigations of Digital Service Taxes (DSTs) adopted by Austria, India, Italy, Spain, Turkey, and the United Kingdom. The final determination in those investigations is to impose additional tariffs on certain goods from these countries, while suspending the tariffs for up to 180 days to provide additional time to complete the ongoing multilateral negotiations on international taxation at the OECD and in the G20 process.

As reported March 31, 2021, the U.S. planned to impose 25% tariffs on:

Commercial Customs Operations Advisory Committee (COAC) will hold its quarterly meeting on Wednesday, June 23, 2021

On Junae 8, 2021, U.S Customs and Border Protection published in the Federal Register (86 FR 30467) notice that the Commercial Customs Operations Advisory Committee (COAC) will hold its quarterly meeting on Wednesday, June 23, 2021. The meeting will be open to the public via webinar only. There is no on- site, in-person option for this quarterly meeting.

Agenda

The COAC will hear from the current subcommittees on the topics listed below and then will review, deliberate, provide observations, and formulate recommendations on how to proceed:

1. The Secure Trade Lanes Subcommittee will present the following updates: The Trusted Trader Working Group will provide an update on the progress of the White Paper on the Implementation of CTPAT Trade Compliance Requirements for Forced Labor; the In-Bond Working Group will provide an update on the progress with the technical enhancements being addressed through the Trade Support Network and the review of regulatory recommendations incorporated within the COAC In-Bond Modernization White Paper to create future efficiency and process development; the Export Modernization Working Group will present their White Paper on Export Operations for the 21st Century along with proposed recommendations; and, the Remote and Autonomous Cargo Processing Working Group will provide an update on the development of a draft White Paper identifying the potential impact of Remote and Autonomous Vehicles to CBP Cargo Processing Operations.

2. The Next Generation Facilitation Subcommittee will provide an update on the following working groups and task force activities: First, the Re-Imagined Entry Processes (RIEP) Working Group has begun a series of deep-dive sessions to review the entire entry process and examine when entry data becomes available. The intent of these sessions is to determine the points along the supply-chain where the data is first available in order to enhance the facilitation and security of the entry process and may provide some strategic recommendations in this area. Next, the One U.S. Government Working Group will provide an update on the following key project: The automation of electronic documents that are currently required at time of entry and the Partner Government Agency Disclaim Handbook. Finally, CBP will provide an update on the progress of the E-Commerce and 21st Century Customs Framework Task Forces.

3. The Intelligent Enforcement Subcommittee will provide a status update on the following: The Bond Working Group will report on the continued work with CBP on the Monetary Guidelines of Setting Bond Amounts, the status of the risk-based bonding initiative, and recommendations on the eBond Pilot; the Antidumping/Countervailing Duty (AD/CVD) Working Group will discuss the ongoing challenges associated with the growing number of AD/CVD cases; the Intellectual Property Rights (IPR) Process Modernization Working Group will provide updates on past recommendations to further the modernization of IPR processes; and, the Forced Labor Working Group will provide an update related to the progress of the three subgroups outlined in the Statement of Work: Informed Compliance Fact Sheet Subgroup, Emerging Traceability Subgroup, and Forced Labor Report and Metrics Subgroup.

4. The Rapid Response Subcommittee will provide an update on the progress of its two working groups. First, the USMCA Working Group hasidentified specific topics for review with the USMCA Center as the anticipated publication of the new regulations approaches. The topics for discussion include export guidance, e-signatures, and the marking rules in part 102 of title 19 of the Code of Federal Regulations (19 CFR part 102). Second, the Broker Exam Modernization Working Group will provide an update on recent exam modernization activities.

Thursday, June 3, 2021

Athletic Shoe Contract Awarded

San Antonio Shoe, San Antonio, Texas, has been awarded a maximum $25,423,460 fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for men’s and women’s athletic shoes. This was a competitive acquisition with three responses received. This is a two-year contract with no option periods. Location of performance is Texas, with a June 2, 2023, ordering period end date. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1-21-D-1458).

CPSC Staff to Participate in ASTM Meeting on Furniture Flammability Standards

Andrew Lock, Consumer Product Safety Commission Laboratory Sciences, will be participating in the ASTM E05.15 committee meetings on fire standards to discuss furniture flammability standards development from 2:00 p.m. 4:00 p.m. EST, June 9, 2021. The meeting is online. For more information contact Andrew Lock (preferred:alock@cpsc.gov or 301-987-2099).

Polyester Textured Yarn Antidumping Investigation

As Agathon Associates reported in December polyester textured yarn antidumping cases are moving forward.

On June 3, 2021, the U.S. Department of Commerce published in the Federal Register (86 FR 29742) Polyester Textured Yarn From Indonesia: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value, Postponement of Final Determination, and Extension of Provisional Measures.

On June 3, 2021, the U.S. Department of Commerce published in the Federal Register (86 FR 29746
) Polyester Textured Yarn From Thailand: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value, Postponement of Final Determination, and Extension of Provisional Measures.

On June 3, 2021, the U.S. Department of Commerce published in the Federal Register (86 FR 29748
) Polyester Textured Yarn From Malaysia: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value, Postponement of Final Determination, and Extension of Provisional Measures.

On June 3, 2021, the U.S. Department of Commerce published in the Federal Register (86 FR 29750
) Polyester Textured Yarn From the Socialist Republic of Vietnam: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value, Postponement of Final Determination, and Extension of Provisional Measures.

Wednesday, June 2, 2021

Coast Guard Safety Boot Contract Awarded

Original Footwear LLC, Arecibo, Puerto Rico, has been awarded a maximum $7,923,201 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for safety boots. This is a one-year base contract with four one-year option periods. This was a competitive acquisition with two responses received. Location of performance is Puerto Rico, with a May 1, 2022, performance completion date. Using customer is Coast Guard. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1-21-D-1454).

Army Combat Shirt Contract Awarded

Aurora Industries, Camuy, Puerto Rico, has been awarded a maximum $10,676,667 modification (P00010) exercising the second one-year option period of a one-year base contract (SPE1C1-19-D-1166) with two one-year option periods for advanced combat unisex shirts. This is a firm-fixed-price, indefinite-quantity contract. Location of performance is Puerto Rico, with a June 4, 2022, ordering period end date. Using military service is Army. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2021 through 2022 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Tuesday, June 1, 2021

Senate Bill Would Open New Section 301 Exclusion Process

On May 27, 2021, the Senate passed the ENDLESS FRONTIER ACT including a process for exclusion of articles from Section 301 duties.

  
TITLE III--IMPROVING TRANSPARENCY AND ADMINISTRATION OF TRADE PROGRAMS 
AND OVERSIGHT AND ACCOUNTABILITY OF TRADE AGENCIES

SEC. 73001. PROCESS FOR EXCLUSION OF ARTICLES FROM DUTIES 
UNDER SECTION 301 OF THE TRADE ACT OF 1974.

   (a) Establishment of General Exclusion Process.--
      (1) In general.--Title III of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 
      U.S.C. 2411 et seq.) is amended by inserting after section 
      305 the following:

     ``SEC. 305A. PROCESS FOR EXCLUSION OF ARTICLES FROM DUTIES.

       ``(a) Analysis of Alternative Action.--Subject to 
     subsection (d), before taking action under section 301(b), 
     the Trade Representative shall analyze the impact of the 
     action on United States entities, particularly small 
     entities, and consumers in the United States with a goal of 
     mitigating the impact of duties on United States entities and 
     consumers in the United States, including by evaluating 
     alternatives or modifications to particular actions.
       ``(b) Process for Exclusion From Duties.--
       ``(1) In general.--Subject to subsection (d), the Trade 
     Representative shall establish and maintain a process for 
     exclusion requests from duties under section 301(b) unless 
     the Trade Representative determines and certifies to the 
     appropriate congressional committees that maintaining an 
     exclusion process--
       ``(A) would impair the ability of the United States to 
     maintain effective pressure to remove unreasonable or 
     discriminatory practices burdening commerce in the United 
     States; or
       ``(B) is impractical due to the low value of the duties 
     imposed.
       ``(2) Briefing.--If the Trade Representative makes a 
     certification under paragraph (1), not later than 3 days 
     before making the certification, the Trade Representative 
     shall brief the appropriate congressional committees 
     regarding the reasons for the certification.
       ``(3) Continued certification.--If the Trade Representative 
     makes a certification under paragraph (1) with respect to 
     duties under section 301(b), not less frequently than once 
     every 180 days while those duties are in effect, the Trade 
     Representative shall determine and certify to the appropriate 
     congressional committees that the reasons for forgoing an 
     exclusion process with respect to those duties continue to be 
     present.
       ``(c) Implementation of Exclusion Process.--
       ``(1) In general.--In implementing an exclusion process 
     required under subsection (b)(1), the Trade Representative 
     shall consider whether and which criteria described in 
     paragraph (2), and such other criteria as the Trade 
     Representative considers appropriate under the circumstances, 
     are appropriate to apply in the exclusion process.
       ``(2) Criteria described.--The criteria described in this 
     paragraph for exclusion of articles from duties under section 
     301(b) include the following:
       ``(A) Whether the failure to grant the exclusion would 
     result in severe economic harm to the requester.
       ``(B) Whether the article or a reasonable substitute is not 
     commercially available to the requester.
       ``(C) Whether the imposition of the duty with respect to 
     the article would unreasonably increase consumer prices for 
     day-to-day items consumed by low- or middle-income families 
     in the United States.
       ``(D) Whether the imposition of the duty would have an 
     unreasonable impact on manufacturing output of the United 
     States.
       ``(E) Whether the imposition of the duty would have an 
     unreasonable impact on the ability of an entity to fulfill 
     contracts or to build critical infrastructure.
       ``(F) Whether the failure to grant the exclusion is likely 
     to result in a particular entity or entities having the 
     ability to abuse a dominant market position.
       ``(d) Exclusion of Certain Duties.--This section shall not 
     apply to duties imposed under section 301(b) pursuant to a 
     dispute resolution process under the World Trade 
     Organization.
       ``(e) Publication of Notice.--Subject to subsection (d), 
     not later than 90 days after imposing any duty under section 
     301(b), the Trade Representative, in consultation with such 
     other Federal agencies as the Trade Representative considers 
     appropriate, shall publish a notice in the Federal Register 
     regarding the criteria that the Trade Representative will 
     apply and the evidence it will evaluate in determining 
     whether a request for exclusion from such duty satisfies the 
     requirements of the exclusion process under subsection 
     (b)(1).
       ``(f) Definitions.--In this section:
       ``(1) Appropriate congressional committees.--The term 
     `appropriate congressional committees' means--
       ``(A) the Committee on Finance of the Senate; and
       ``(B) the Committee on Ways and Means of the House of 
     Representatives.
       ``(2) Severe economic harm.--The term `severe economic 
     harm', with respect to an exclusion from duties requested by 
     a United States entity, includes circumstances under which 
     failure to grant the exclusion would--
       ``(A) render the business of the entity unprofitable; or
       ``(B) result in a significant number or proportion of the 
     workers employed by the entity becoming totally separated 
     from employment.
       ``(3) Small entities.--The term `small entities' has the 
     meaning given the term `small entity' in section 601 of title 
     5, United States Code.
       ``(4) United states entity.--The term `United States 
     entity' means an entity organized under the laws of the 
     United States or of any jurisdiction within the United 
     States, including a foreign branch of such an entity.''.
       (2) Clerical amendment.--The table of contents for the 
     Trade Act of 1974 is amended by inserting after the item 
     relating to section 305 the following:

    ``Sec. 305A. Process for exclusion of articles from duties.''.
    
   (b) Establishment of Exclusion Process for Certain Duties 
   Relating to People's Republic of China.--
      (1) In general.--Notwithstanding any other provision of 
       law, the United States Trade Representative shall establish a 
       process pursuant to which United States entities and 
       associations of those entities may request the exclusion of 
       articles from duties described in paragraph (2).
      (2) Duties described.--The duties described in this 
       paragraph are duties imposed pursuant to the investigation 
       initiated under section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 
       U.S.C. 2411) on August 18, 2017, and with respect to which 
       notice was published in the Federal Register on August 24, 
       2017 (82 Fed. Reg. 40213).
      (3) Implementation of exclusion process.--In implementing 
       the process established under paragraph (1) for exclusion of 
       articles from duties described in paragraph (2), if the 
       exclusion of the article can likely be administered by U.S. 
       Customs and Border Protection--
          (A) the Trade Representative shall exclude that article 
          from the imposition of such a duty if the Trade 
          Representative determines, following a request from a United 
          States entity or an association of those entities, that the 
          failure to grant the exclusion would result in severe 
          economic harm to the requester;
          (B) unless the Trade Representative determines that 
          granting the exclusion would impair the ability of the United 
          States to maintain effective pressure to remove an 
          unreasonable or discriminatory practice burdening United 
          States commerce, the Trade Representative shall exclude that 
          article from the imposition of such a duty if the Trade 
          Representative determines following a request from a United 
          States entity or an association of those entities that--
             (i) the article or a reasonable substitute is not 
             commercially available to the requester;
             (ii) the imposition of the duty with respect to the article 
             would unreasonably increase consumer prices for day-to-day 
             items consumed by low- or middle-income families in the 
             United States;
             (iii) the imposition of the duty would have an unreasonable 
             impact on manufacturing output of the United States;
             (iv) the imposition of the duty would have an unreasonable 
             impact on the ability of an entity to fulfill contracts or to 
             build critical infrastructure; or
             (v) the failure to grant the exclusion is likely to result 
             in a particular entity or entities having the ability to 
             abuse a dominant market position; and
          (C) the Trade Representative may identify other criteria 
          relevant to determining whether the article shall be excluded 
          from the imposition of such a duty.
      (4) Timeframe of exclusion and renewal.--
          (A) Period of exclusion.--An exclusion of an article 
          requested under paragraph (1) from duties described in 
          paragraph (2)--
            (i) shall be for a period of 18 months; and
            (ii) shall be decided--
               (I) not later than 90 days before the duty is due to be 
               paid; or
               (II) if the Trade Representative determines that the 
               request presents exceptionally complex issues or requires 
               additional evidence, not later than 120 days before the duty 
               is due to be paid.
          (B) Renewal.--The Trade Representative shall allow 
          applications for renewal of an exclusion under paragraph (1) 
          to be submitted not later than 90 days before the exclusion 
          is set to expire.
          (C) Failure to act.--If the Trade Representative fails to 
          decide an exclusion request under subparagraph (A)(ii) during 
          the appropriate period set forth under that subparagraph, the 
          exclusion request will be deemed to have been granted until 
          the date that is 30 days after the Trade Representative 
          publishes in the Federal Register a decision not to grant the 
          request.
      (5) Written reasoning.--
          (A) In general.--If the Trade Representative denies a 
          request for an exclusion under paragraph (1), the Trade 
          Representative shall provide to the requester of the 
          exclusion a reasoned determination for denying the request.
          (B) Substantial evidence.--A determination under 
          subparagraph (A) shall be supported by substantial evidence 
          from the administrative record.
      (6) Review.--
          (A) In general.--Not later than 180 days after the date of 
          the enactment of this Act, and annually thereafter, the 
          Comptroller General of the United States shall conduct an 
          audit of the exclusion process established under paragraph (1).
         (B) Elements of audit.--Each audit required by subparagraph (A) shall--
            (i) include a review of the process for--
               (I) receiving and reviewing exclusion requests under 
               paragraph (1);
               (II) determining eligibility for an exclusion;
               (III) applying relevant criteria for an exclusion; and
               (IV) making determinations regarding whether to grant an 
               exclusion;
            (ii) examine the information provided to applicants prior 
            to seeking an exclusion, as well as throughout the exclusion 
            application process; and
            (iii) analyze the timeliness of decisions, the consistency 
            of decisions, and the internal review process for making 
            decisions with respect to an exclusion.
      (7) Regulations.--
         (A) Implementation of process.--Not later than 120 days 
         after the date of the enactment of this Act, The Trade 
         Representative, in consultation with such other Federal 
         agencies as the Trade Representative considers appropriate, 
         shall prescribe regulations regarding the criteria that the 
         Trade Representative will apply and the evidence the Trade 
         Representative will evaluate in deciding whether any of the 
         conditions in paragraph (3) have been satisfied with respect 
         to an exclusion request under paragraph (1).
         (B) Severe economic harm.--The Trade Representative shall 
         prescribe regulations regarding the definition of severe 
         economic harm under paragraph (8), including by setting forth 
         the evidence necessary to establish that a business is 
         unprofitable, that workers will be separated, and other 
         circumstances in which severe economic harm may be 
         demonstrated.
      (8) Definitions.--In this subsection:
         (A) Severe economic harm.--The term ``severe economic 
         harm'', with respect to an exclusion from duties requested by 
         a United States entity or an association of those entities, 
         includes circumstances under which failure to grant the 
         exclusion would--
            (i) render the business of the entity or entities 
            unprofitable; or
            (ii) result in a significant number or proportion of the 
            workers employed by the entity or entities becoming totally 
            separated from employment.
         (B) United states entity.--The term ``United States 
         entity'' means an entity organized under the laws of the 
         United States or of any jurisdiction within the United 
         States, including a foreign branch of such an entity.
   (c) Treatment of Certain Exclusions Relating to People's 
   Republic of China.--
      (1) Reauthorization of exclusions.--All covered duty 
      exclusions shall be reinstituted for entries filed on or 
      before December 31, 2022.
      (2) Retroactive application for certain liquidations and 
      reliquidations.--
         (A) In general.--Notwithstanding section 514 of the Tariff 
         Act of 1930 (19 U.S.C. 1514) or any other provision of law 
         and subject to subparagraph (B), any entry of a covered 
         article on which duties were paid under section 301(b) of the 
         Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2411(b)) and to which a covered 
         duty exclusion would have applied if the entry were made on 
         December 31, 2020, that was made--
            (i) after December 31, 2020, and
            (ii) before the date of the enactment of this Act,
            shall be liquidated or reliquidated as though such entry 
            occurred on such date of enactment.
         (B) Requests.--A liquidation or reliquidation may be made 
         under subparagraph (A) with respect to an entry of an article 
         only if a request therefor is filed with U.S. Customs and 
         Border Protection not later than 180 days after the date of 
         the enactment of this Act that contains sufficient 
         information to enable U.S. Customs and Border Protection--
            (i) to identify and reconstruct the entry, if necessary; and
            (ii) to verify that the article is a covered article.
         (C) Payment of amounts owed.--Any amounts owed by the 
         United States pursuant to the liquidation or reliquidation of 
         an entry of a covered article under subparagraph (A) shall be 
         paid, without interest, not later than 90 days after the date 
         of the liquidation or reliquidation (as the case may be).
      (3) Definitions.--In this subsection:
        (A) Covered article.--The term ``covered article'' means an 
        article that qualifies for a covered duty exclusion from 
        duties paid under section 301(b) of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 
        U.S.C. 2411(b)) that was not granted by the United States 
        Trade Representative within 180 days of the date of 
        liquidation of an entry containing such an article.
        (B) Covered duty exclusion.--The term ``covered duty 
        exclusion'' means a specific article exclusion that was--
           (i) granted in the investigation initiated under section 
           301 of the Trade Act of 1974 (19 U.S.C. 2411) on August 18, 
           2017, and with respect to which notice was published in the 
           Federal Register on August 24, 2017 (82 Fed. Reg. 40213); and
           (ii) published in the Federal Register.
        (C) Entry.--The term ``entry'' includes a withdrawal from 
        warehouse for consumption.

Senate Passes Miscellaneous Tariff Bill

Since the 1980s congress has, from time to time, enacted temporary duty suspensions relating to articles not available from domestic sources. A long list of duty suspenstion provisions are bundled into a single bill, which may, or may not, be officially named the "Miscellaneous Tariff Bill," but which is always refered to as the MTB.

The last MTB was passed in September 2018 and provided for temporary suspensions of duties through December 31, 2020. Those expired duty suspensions included 74 relating to textile fiber, yarn, or fabric. On May 27, 2021, the Senate passed its version of MTB renewal. Of the 74 expired provisions, the Senate bill renews 45 with no changes, renews 12 with modifications to the article description, renews two with changes to the rate of duty (in some cases the MTB does not fully eliminate the tariff, rather it merely reduces the rate). The remaing 15 are not renewed. Additionally, the Senate bill creates 46 new duty suspensions relating to textiles.

Now attention moves to the House.

Agathon Associates has done a detailed analysis of the Senate MTB, to receive it please email David Trumbull at david@agathonassociates.com.