Tuesday, June 28, 2022

Physical Training Uniform Contract Awarded

SND Manufacturing, Dallas, Texas, is awarded an $11,511,004 modification to previously awarded, indefinite-delivery/indefinite quantity contract M67854-21-D-1881 for the purchase of physical training uniforms. The contract ceiling increase resulted from revised product descriptions, patterns and specifications. The total cumulative face value of the contract is now $46,841,204. Work will be performed in Dallas, Texas, with an expected completion date of April 2026. No funds were obligated at time of award. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Virginia, is the contracting activity.

Physical Training Uniform Awarded

String King Lacrosse LLC, Gardena, California, was awarded a $14,931,782 modification to previously awarded, indefinite-delivery/indefinite quantity contract M67854-21-D-1882 for the purchase of physical training uniforms. The contract ceiling increase resulted from revised product descriptions, patterns and specifications. The total cumulative face value of the contract is now $38,154,362. Work will be performed in Gardena, California, with an expected completion date of April 2026. No funds were obligated at time of award. The Marine Corps Systems Command, Quantico, Virginia, is the contracting activity. \

House Armed Services Committee Adopts 2023 NDAA Amendment to Ban Chinese Goods from Sale on Military Bases

AMENDMENT TO H.R. 7900 OFFERED BY MR. GREEN OF TENNESSEE At the appropriate place in title VI, insert the following: 1 SEC. 6ll. PROHIBITION ON SALE OF CHINESE GOODS IN 2 COMMISSARY STORES AND MILITARY EX3 CHANGES. 4 The Secretary of Defense shall prohibit the sale, at 5 a commissary store or military exchange, of goods— 6 (1) manufactured in China; 7 (2) assembled in China; or 8 (3) imported into the United States from 9 China. HERE.

Thursday, June 23, 2022

Resident Home Must Pay $753,000 and Cease Made in USA Fraud

The Federal Trade Commission has finalized an order against Resident Home LLC and owner Ran Reske for allegedly making false, misleading, or unsupported advertising claims that their imported DreamCloud mattresses were made from 100% USA-made materials. Resident Home LLC and Reske will pay $753,000.

Read more HERE.

The Children's Place Recalls Baby Boy Rompers Due to Choking Hazard

Description: This recall involves Baby Boy Dino Rompers and Baby Boy Camo Rompers 2-Pack. The Dino Romper is a blue short-sleeve romper made of 100 percent cotton jersey featuring a dinosaur on the left chest and was sold in sizes 0-3M, 3-6M, 6-9M, 9-12M, 12-18M, and 18-24M. The Camo Romper Two Pack was sold in sizes 0-3M, 3-6M, 6-9M, 9-12M, 12-18M, and 18-24M and contained one gray long-sleeve romper made of 100 percent cotton jersey in a camouflage print and one gray short-sleeve romper with black shoulders and sleeves. The Baby Boy Dino style number 3031536 can be found on a sewn-in, side-seam label inside the garment. The Baby Boy Camo Romper 2-Pack style number 3026902 can be found on a sewn-in, side-seam label inside the garment.

Remedy: Consumers should immediately take the recalled rompers away from children and return the rompers to any The Children’s Place store for a full refund. The company will send an email notice to all customers who bought the product on the firm’s website with instructions on how to receive a full refund for the recalled products.

Incidents/Injuries: The firm has received two reports of snaps detaching from the rompers. No injuries have been reported.

Sold At: The Baby Boy Dino Rompers were sold at The Children's Place stores nationwide and online at www.childrensplace.com and Amazon from March 2022 through June 2022 for about $25. The Camo Rompers Two Pack were sold at The Children's Place stores nationwide and online at www.childrensplace.com and Amazon from January 2022 through June 2022 for about $35.

Importer(s): The Children's Place, of Secaucus, New Jersey

Manufactured In: India

Recall number: 22-170

More information and photos HERE.

Richie House Recalls Children’s Robes Due to Violation of Federal Flammability Standards and Burn Hazard; Sold Exclusively at Walmart.com

Description: This recall involves “A Memory In” branded pink children’s robes made of 100% polyester. The long-sleeved bathrobes have two front pockets and two side seam belt loops with a matching belt. They were sold in children’s sizes 5, 6, 8, 10, 12 and 14. “100% Polyester,” “exclusive of trim,” and the fabric product unit number and garment production unit number are printed on the side seam label. The fabric product unit number and garment production unit number included in this recall are FPU NO. AM003 and GPU NO. AM003-1.

Remedy: Consumers should immediately take the recalled robes away from children and contact Richie House for a full refund. Consumers who purchased the robes will be asked to destroy the garments by cutting them in half and send the recalling firm a photo of the destroyed garment and of the garment’s side seam label. Upon receipt of the photos, consumers will be issued a full refund. Walmart and Richie House are contacting all known purchasers directly.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported

Sold At: Online at www.walmart.com from March 2021 through March 2022 for between $22 and $28.

Importer(s): Richie House, of Irvine, California

Manufactured In: China

Recall number: 22-172

More information and photos HERE.

Navy Uniform Contract Awarded

Silver Oak Leaf Inc.,*** Alpharetta, Georgia, has been awarded a maximum $10,716,250 modification (P00020) exercising the third one-year option period of an 18-month base contract (SPE1C1-19-D-1135) with three one-year option periods for working uniform blouses and trousers. This is a firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. Location of performance is Puerto Rico, with a June 22, 2023, ordering period end date. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2022 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

***Service-disabled veteran-owned small business

Saturday, June 18, 2022

Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force Launches Enforcement Strategy for the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act

On June 17, 2022, the Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force (FLETF) launched the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) enforcement strategy. The launch of the enforcement strategy precedes the June 21, 2022 date on which the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) will begin to enforce the UFLPA’s rebuttable presumption which prohibits, pursuant to Section 307 of the Tariff Act of 1930, the importation of any goods, wares, articles, and merchandise mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China, or produced by certain entities.

The FLETF, chaired by Department of Homeland Security, leads efforts to monitor the enforcement of the prohibition on importing goods made wholly or in part with forced labor into the United States. The FLETF comprises seven member agencies, including the Office of the United States Trade Representative and the Departments of Labor, State, Treasury, Justice, and Commerce.

Friday, June 17, 2022

Navy Wool Cloth Contract Awarded

Burlington Industries LLC, Greensboro, North Carolina, has been awarded a maximum $10,803,000 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity letter contract for wool cloth. This was a sole-source acquisition using justification 10 U.S. Code 2304 (c)(1), as stated in Federal Acquisition Regulation 6.302-1. This is a one-year contract with no option periods. The ordering period end date is June 16, 2023. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2022 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1-22-D-1560).

Children’s Sleepwear Recalled Due to Violation of Federal Flammability Standards and Burn Hazard; Imported by Loulou Lollipop

Description: This recall involves Loulou Lollipop children’s pajamas made of 66% Tencel lyocell, 28% organic cotton and 6% spandex. The one-piece, long-sleeved pajamas were sold in 19 prints: Avocado, Bluebell, Butterfly, Canyon Rainbow, Flower Vine, Grey Mudcloth, Morning Dew, Moon, Nomad, Peace Dove, Planets, Painterly Seahorses, Rainbow Dye, Shell Floral, Sepia Rose, Sepia Rose Floral, Seashells, Sun, And Umbra. The tight-fitting sleepwear was sold in two children’s sizes 12-18M and 18-24M. “Loulou Lollipop,” size and purchase number are printed at the neck. The purchase numbers included in this recall are SS22-GR-APP-001 and AW2021-APP001.

Remedy: Consumers should immediately take the recalled sleepwear away from children and contact Loulou Lollipop for a full refund. Consumers who purchased the sleepwear will be asked to destroy the garments by cutting them in half and sending the firm a photo of the destroyed product, including the neck label. Upon receipt of the photos, consumers will be issued a full refund or a store gift card. The firm is contacting all known purchasers directly.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported

Sold At: Online at www.louloulollipop.com and at various children’s boutiques nationwide from November 2021 through May 2022 for between $29 to $38.

Importer(s): Loulou Lollipop, of Canada

Manufactured In: China

Recall number: 22-165

More informationa and photos HERE.

DoD Defense Contract Finance Study

On June 17, 2022, the U.S. Department of Defense published in the Federal Register (87 FR 36472) [Docket Number DARS–2022–0012] Department of Defense Contract Finance Study.

The DoD Contract Finance Study is the first comprehensive contract finance study since publication of the Defense Financial and Investment Review in June 1985. DoD is committed to transparency and is interested in obtaining the perspective of companies of all sizes as well as individuals on a number of relevant topics to contribute to this important study.

Comments may be submitted at https://www.regulations.gov/ (Search for "Docket Number DARS-2022-0012"). Comments are due by July 18, 2022.

The Government Accountability Office (GAO) Final Report, GAO–19–406, "CONTRACT FINANCING: DoD Should Comprehensively Assess How Its Policies Affect the Defense Industries," dated June 27, 2019, recommended a comprehensive assessment of the effect that DoD's contract financing and profit policies have on the defense industry. DoD concurred with this recommendation. The study is comprised of two phases with multiple parts and participants. The first phase includes data collection, research, and analysis. The second phase may include policy recommendations.

DoD is particularly interested in comments and information with regard to contract finance policies as they affect all levels of the defense sector. Note that for the purpose of understanding financial health over time, the DoD Contract Finance Study is not covering impacts of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic. Therefore, unless specifically asked, responses should exclude the period after the presidential declaration of a national emergency concerning the COVID 19 pandemic (March 13, 2020). DoD is seeking input from all business sizes, as identified below, on the following topics:

1. Financial Health

a. What is your view of the financial health of the Defense Industrial Base? Has it improved over the last decade or two? Please provide your reasons and a description of any financial metrics that you think are relevant to answering these questions.

b. How does the Defense Sector compare to relevant commercial sectors when it comes to financial health? Please explain.

c. How important is cash flow and why? In the context of publicly traded companies, how do cash flow-related metrics influence executive compensation?

2. Financing

a. For companies who perform work on DoD contracts as either a prime contractor or subcontractor, what, if any, obstacles have you encountered in obtaining financing? Please explain and also identify whether you are a large or small business.

b. For companies who perform work both for DoD and in the commercial sector, what is your view on how financing compares between DoD and your commercial customers? Please explain. What about delivery terms? For example, DoD's terms to prime contractors are 30 days. How does this compare to commercial terms?

3. Prime Contractors (Regardless of Size Status) on Defense Contracts

a. What is your size status (see Federal Acquisition Regulation (FAR) part 19) in the context of your defense work?

b. What percentage of your suppliers receive contract financing (payments prior to delivery) from your firm?

c. Is the answer different for large business suppliers than for small business suppliers? Does one group receive financing more often than the other?

d. What are your criteria for determining which suppliers receive financing?

e. How do your lower-tier suppliers know they are performing under a Government prime contract?

f. If you have been or are receiving a higher progress payment rate due to the COVID-19 pandemic, have you accelerated payments to your suppliers since the COVID-19 pandemic? If so, by how much time have you accelerated payments to your suppliers? Please be specific. Did you provide financing (predelivery payments) to suppliers that were not receiving financing prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?

g. If you did not receive a higher progress payment rate due to the COVID-19 pandemic, e.g., you do not receive progress payments on your defense contract, did you accelerate payments to your suppliers since the COVID-19 pandemic? If so, by how much time have you accelerated payments to your suppliers? Please be specific and address the extent to which you have accelerated payments. Did you provide financing (predelivery payments) to suppliers that were not receiving financing prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?

4. Subcontractors or Suppliers (Regardless of Size Status) Under a Defense Contract

a. When you are performing as a subcontractor or supplier under a defense prime contract, how do you know that the ultimate customer is the Federal Government?

b. Do you know the prime contract number (between the prime and the Government)? If so, how? Do you know who the Federal Government contracting officer is, or how to contact them? Would you be willing to contact the contracting officer if you were experiencing issues getting paid?

c. Have financing payments or payments upon delivery from your customer (contractor) been accelerated during the COVID-19 pandemic? What are your normal terms and how much time have payments been accelerated? Did you receive financing (predelivery payments) from your prime or higher-tier contractor that you did not receive prior to the COVID-19 pandemic?

d. Are there any conditions (e.g., changes in terms) associated with receiving payments from your prime or higher-tier contractor in a more expedited manner?

5. Small Businesses Performing on Defense Contracts

a. If you are a small business performing as a prime contractor, what is your experience regarding receipt of timely payments from DoD?

b. If you are a small business performing as a supplier or subcontractor, are you aware of whether the clause at Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement (DFARS) 252.232-7017, Accelerating Payments to Small Business Subcontractors--Prohibition on Fees and Consideration, is in the prime's contract? Is the substance of this clause in your subcontract?

c. What are your normal payment terms (e.g., amount of time) for financing and for delivery?

d. Are you receiving accelerated payments from your prime contractor? By how many days are payments being accelerated?

Thursday, June 16, 2022

Navy Hat Contract Awarded

ORC Industries Inc., La Crosse, Wisconsin, has been awarded a maximum $13,303,496 modification (P00003) exercising the first one-year option period of a one-year base contract (SPE1C1-21-D-N154) with four one-year option periods for service dixie hats. This is a firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. The ordering period end date is June 27, 2023. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2022 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

Federal Prison Industries Awarded Flame Resistant Coveralls Contract

Federal Prison Industries Inc.,** Washington, D.C., has been awarded a maximum $18,079,200 modification (P00013) exercising the third one-year option period of a one-year base contract (SPE1C1-19-D-F027) with four one-year option periods for utility, improved flame resistant coveralls. This is a firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. Locations of performance are Georgia, Arizona and Mississippi, with a June 20, 2023, ordering period end date. Using military service is Navy. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2022 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

** Mandatory source

AAFA Urges Congress to Allow Digital Labeling for Clothes

On June 9, 2022, the American Apparel and Footwear Association urged Congress to approve legislation to direct the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) to allow for mandated labeling information on clothes to be delivered to consumers through digital labels using different technologies, including but not limited to QR codes. Such legislation would modernize outdated federal regulations to the benefit of consumers.

Domestic Sources Sought for Reflective Fabric

REFLECTIVE FABRIC Nylon, Polyester and Lycra meet the following specifications:

REFLECTIVE NYLON 100% Polyamide fibers with reflective microspheres (25 washes) reflective microspheres coating with PU plastic adhesive

REFLECTIVE POLYESTER 100% Polyester fibers with reflective microspheres (25 washes) reflective microspheres coating with PU plastic adhesive

REFLECTIVE LYCRA 92% Polyester fibers 8% lycra with reflective microspheres (25 washes)

Screen Printing with reflective microspheres

Wednesday, June 15, 2022

CBP’s Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act Importer Guidance Available

The Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) was signed into law by President Biden on December 23, 2021.

It establishes a rebuttable presumption that the importation of any goods, wares, articles, and merchandise mined, produced, or manufactured wholly or in part in the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region of the People’s Republic of China, or produced by certain entities on the Forced Labor Enforcement Task Force (FLETF) Entity List, is prohibited by Section 307 of the Tariff Act of 1930 and that such goods, wares, articles, and merchandise are not entitled to entry to the United States. The presumption applies unless the Commissioner of U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) determines that the importer of record has fully complied with the FLETF-issued importer guidance, responded to all inquiries, and determines by clear and convincing evidence, that the goods, wares, articles, or merchandise were not produced using forced labor.

CBP has released importer guidance to assist the trade community in preparing for the implementation of the UFLPA rebuttable presumption that goes into effect on June 21, 2022. Please be aware that this CBP guidance document is intended to provide operational guidance to trade stakeholders and complements the UFLPA strategy guidance. Importer must comply with the importer guidance within UFLPA strategy. UFLPA, Section 3(b).

Be sure to frequently check CBP’s UFLPA webpage for the latest information on the UFLPA

Monday, June 20, 2022, is Juneteenth National Independence Day in America

Last year, President Biden signed into law the Juneteenth National Independence Day Act, creating a federal holiday to commemorate Juneteenth. This is the first federal holiday approved since Martin Luther King Jr. Day in 1983. This year, because the holiday falls on Sunday, it will be observed on Monday, June 20. Government offices will be closed. Retail businesses, for the most part, will be open, just as they stay open for several of the federal holidays. As for non-retail business, the holiday is still too new to know who will and will not observe it.

On June 19, 1865, federal troops arrived in Galveston, Texas to take control of the state and ensure that all enslaved people be freed. This, however, was two and a half years after the Emancipation Proclamation went into effect January, 1863. This day, the oldest known celebration commemorating the end of slavery in the United States, has become a day for African Americans to celebrate not only their freedom, but their history, culture and achievements.

"On Juneteenth, we recommit ourselves to the work of equity, equality, and justice. And, we celebrate the centuries of struggle, courage, and hope that have brought us to this time of progress and possibility. That work has been led throughout our history by abolitionists and educators, civil rights advocates and lawyers, courageous activists and trade unionists, public officials, and everyday Americans who have helped make real the ideals of our founding documents for all."

-- A Proclamation on Juneteenth Day of Observance, 2021, President Joseph Biden, June 18, 2021.

"Juneteenth reminds us of both the unimaginable injustice of slavery and the incomparable joy that must have attended emancipation. It is both a remembrance of a blight on our history and a celebration of our Nation’s unsurpassed ability to triumph over darkness…. This Juneteenth, we commit, as one Nation, to live true to our highest ideals and to build always toward a freer, stronger country that values the dignity and boundless potential of all Americans."

-- Presidential Message on Juneteenth, 2020, President Donald J. Trump

The original of the Emancipation Proclamation of January 1, 1863, is in the National Archives in Washington, D.C. The final proclamation was first printed in January 1863, as a two-page broadsheet with the printed signatures of Lincoln and Secretary of State William H. Seward. Later, a limited edition of forty-eight copies was printed. They were signed in pen by Lincoln, Seward, and Lincoln's secretary, John G. Nicolay, the copies were donated to raise money for the group that later became the Red Cross. About twenty known copies of the document have survived in public and private hands. Number 32 of this 48-copy edition is at the Boston Athenaeum on Beacon Street. I had the great pleasure of viewing it at a January 20, 2009, Athenaeum event to watch the Inauguration of President Barack Obama.

Modernization of the Customs Broker Regulations (19 CFR 111) Proposed Changes

On June 8, 2022, U.S. Customs and Border Protection announced the publication of the Notices of Proposed Rulemaking (NPRMs) for the long-awaited update to 19 CFR 111. The NPRM for the Modernization of the Customs Broker Regulations (85 FR 34836) and the NPRM for the Elimination of the Customs Broker District Permit Fee (85 FR 34549) were published on June 5, 2020. The comment period for both NPRMs ended on August 4, 2020.

Modernization of the Customs Broker Regulations (19 CFR 111) Proposed Changes 

Some of the proposed changes are listed below: 

 Establish one national permit for each broker

  • Eliminate the district permit and transition to a single permit framework (national permit) that operates at the national level within the customs territory of the United States
  • Eliminate the need for brokers to request permit waivers and maintain district offices

 Broker Fee Changes and Electronic Payment

  • Increase the license application fee for individual and organization license applications to better align application fees to CBP's processing expenses
  • Expand payment options for brokers to include electronic fee payment

 Broker Reporting and Electronic Data Interface (ACE)

  • Enhance the ACE broker portal and streamline broker reporting

 Customs Business within the U.S. Customs Territory and Knowledgeable Point of Contact

  • Require that customs business be conducted within the customs territory of the United States
  • Require that brokers designate a knowledgeable point of contact to be available to CBP during and outside of normal operating hours to respond to customs business issues

 Broker/Client Relationship

  • Require brokers to obtain a customs power of attorney directly from the importer of record/drawback claimant, not via a freight forwarder
  • Report to CBP when brokers terminate representation of a client as a result of determining that the client is attempting to defraud or otherwise commit any criminal act against the U.S. Government
  • Require brokers to advise the client on the proper corrective actions required and retain a record of broker communication with the client in cases of noncompliance, error or omission

 Responsible Supervision and Control  Requirements

  • Require brokers to submit a supervision plan with a national permit application to detail how the entity intends to exercise Responsible Supervision and Control
  • Update and add factors related to Responsible Supervision and Control to reflect the transition to a national permit framework
  • Require brokers to employ a sufficient number of licensed brokers to ensure Responsible Supervision and Control over their customs business

 Cyber Security and Records Requirements

  • Require brokers to maintain records, including electronic records, within U.S. customs territory
  • Require brokers to notify CBP when there has been a breach of electronic or physical broker records and provide the compromised importer of record numbers

Sources Sought for Cotton Fleece Fabric

A company is interested in sourcing certain cotton fleece fabric in the DR-CAFTA region in the quantities and as specified below.

FABRIC TYPECotton Fleece
FIBER CONTENT77-83% cotton, 17-23% polyester
FACE YARN100% combed cotton ring spun, 41/1 to 48/1 metric (24/1 to 28/1)
TIE YARN183 to 188 / 48 filament metric filament polyester ( 49 to 51 / 48 filament denier)
FLEECE YARNSingle ply staple 67 to 73 percent cotton and 27 to 33 percent polyester staple, 23.7/1 to 20.5/1 metric number (14/1 to 18/1)
MACHINE GAUGE20 to 21
FABRIC WEIGHT257 to 294 grams per square meter (7.6 to 8.7 ounces per square yard)
QUANTITY required3,500,000 kg per year
HTSUS subheading6001.21
REMARKSVertical and horizontal shrinkage must be less than 5% Torque may not exceed 4% All fabrics must have a Class 1 flammability rating For optimum fabric integrity and stitch definition, this fabric must be knit on machines with number of yarn feeds in a multiple of 3.

NOTE: The yarn size designations describe a range of yarn specifications for yarn before knitting, dyeing and finishing of the fabric. They are intended as specifications to be followed by the mill in sourcing yarn used to produce the fabric. Dyeing, finishing and knitting can alter the characteristic of the yarn as it appears in the finished fabric. This specification therefore includes yarn sizes provided that the variation occurs after processing of the greige yarn and production of the fabric. The specifications for the fabric apply to the fabric itself prior to cutting and sewing of the finished garment. Such processing may alter the measurements.

Tuesday, June 14, 2022

Army and Air Force Trouser Contract Awarded

Pentaq Manufacturing Corp.,** Sabana Grande, Puerto Rico, has been awarded a maximum $21,366,113 modification (P00020) exercising the second one-year option period of a one-year base contract (SPE1C1-20-D-1258) with four one-year option periods for various types of trousers. This is a firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract. The ordering period end date is June 16, 2023. Using military services are Army and Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2022 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.

**Small-disadvantaged business in historically underutilized business zones.

Friday, June 10, 2022

Military Uniform Cold Weather Undergarments Contract Awarded

Peckham Vocational Industries Inc.,*** Lansing, Michigan, has been awarded a maximum $13,357,500 firm-fixed‐price, indefinite‐delivery/indefinite‐quantity contract for military uniform cold weather undergarments. This is a one‐year base contract with four one‐year option periods. The ordering period end date is June 9, 2023. Using military services are Army, Navy, Air Force and Marine Corps. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2022 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1‐22‐D‐N163).

***Mandatory source

The Commercial Customs Operations Advisory Committee (COAC) will hold its quarterly meeting on Wednesday, June 29, 2022

The COAC will meet on Wednesday, June 29, 2022, from 1 p.m. to 5 p.m. EDT.

The COAC will hear from the current subcommittees on the topics listed below:

1. The Intelligent Enforcement Subcommittee will provide updates on the work completed and topics discussed for its working groups. The Antidumping/Countervailing Duty (AD/CVD) Working Group will provide updates regarding its work and discussions on importer compliance with AD/CVD requirements. The Intellectual Property Rights Process Modernization Working Group will provide updates regarding development of an electronic notice of detention and enhanced procedures for manipulation of shipments, in addition to other practical proposals for enhancing communication concerning intellectual property rights issues between the trade, the rights holders, and CBP. The Bond Working Group's updates will include the status of proposed revisions to Directive 3510-004, ``Monetary Guidelines for Setting Bond Amounts,'' and the testing of electronic delivery of CBP Form 5955a Notice of Penalty or Liquidated Damages Incurred and Demand for Payment. The Forced Labor Working Group will submit recommendations for the committee's consideration regarding the Uyghur Forced Labor Prevention Act (UFLPA) implementation as well as the UFLPA Importer Guidelines.

2. The Next Generation Facilitation Subcommittee will provide updates on its task forces and working groups, including an update on the progress of the 21st Century Customs Framework (21CCF) and E-Commerce Task Forces, and it is expected there will be recommendations for the committee's consideration in both areas. The Automated Commercial Environment (ACE) 2.0 Working Group will present recommendations for the committee's consideration stemming from the in-depth gap analysis of areas that may be improved when CBP embarks on ACE 2.0 modernization. Finally, the One U.S. Government Working Group will provide an update on the work planned for upcoming quarters of the 16th Term of the COAC.

3. The Rapid Response Subcommittee will provide updates for the Domestic Manufacturing and Production (DMAP) Working Group and the Broker Modernization Working Group. CBP formed the DMAP Working Group to collaborate and obtain input from industry stakeholders on trade enforcement areas impacting domestic manufacturers and producers. While this is a new group, the expectation is that recommendations will be developed and submitted for consideration at an upcoming COAC public meeting. The topics for discussion for the Broker Modernization Working Group will include the April 2022 broker exam, potential regulatory updates to 19 CFR part 111, and requiring continuing education for licensed customs brokers.

4. The Secure Trade Lanes Subcommittee will provide updates on the progress and plans for the In-Bond Working Group and the Remote and Autonomous Cargo Processing Working Group. The Partnership Programs and Industry Engagement Working Group (formerly Trusted Trader Working Group) topics of discussion will include the inclusion of forced labor into the Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (CTPAT) program, as well as the proposed requirements CTPAT members must meet to mitigate the risk of forced labor in their supply chains. The Export Modernization Working Group will provide updates regardingthe development of policies for industry and government partners regarding data collection and sharing in all modes for exportation of goods out of the United States.

More information HERE.

Wednesday, June 8, 2022

Certain Amorphous Silica Fabric From the People’s Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order

On June 8, 2022, the International Trade Administration published in the Federal Register (87 FR 34845) Certain Amorphous Silica Fabric From the People’s Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset Review of the Antidumping Duty Order.

Tuesday, June 7, 2022

Manufacturing Extension Partnership Advisory Board

On June 7, 2022, the Manufacturing Extension Partnership Advisory Board published in the Federal Register (87 FR 34254) Manufacturing Extension Partnership Advisory Board.

The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Manufacturing Extension Partnership (MEP) Advisory Board will meet on Wednesday, June 8, 2022 from 9:00 a.m. to 3:00 p.m. Central Time. The meeting is partially closed to the public in order to protect the confidential and proprietary data to be examined and discussed at the meeting.

Certain Amorphous Silica Fabric From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Expedited First Sunset Review of the Countervailing Duty Order

On June 7, 2022, the International Trade Administration published in the Federal Register (87 FR 34641) Certain Amorphous Silica Fabric From the People's Republic of China: Final Results of the Epedited First Sunset Review of the Countervailing Duty Order

Request for Comments on Proposed U.S.-Taiwan Initiative on 21st-Century Trade

On June 7, 2022, the Office of the U.S. Trade Representative published in the Federal Register (87 FR 34745) Request for Comments on Proposed U.S.-Taiwan Initiative on 21st-Century Trade

Certain Superabsorbent Polymers From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value, Postponement of Final Determination, and Extension of Provisional Measures

On June 7, 2022, the International Trade Administration published in the Federal Register (87 FR 34647) Certain Superabsorbent Polymers From the Republic of Korea: Preliminary Affirmative Determination of Sales at Less Than Fair Value, Postponement of Final Determination, and Extension of Provisional Measures

Friday, June 3, 2022

USTR Extends 301 Exclusions for Pandemic-Related Articles

On June 3, 2022, the Office of the United States Trade Representative published in the Federal Register (87 FR 33871) Notice of Product Exclusion Extensions: China’s Acts, Policies, and Practices Related to Technology Transfer, Intellectual Property, and Innovation. The Trade Representative has determined to extend 81 of the COVID–19 related product exclusions for an additional 6 months.

Thursday, June 2, 2022

Army and Air Force Trouser Contract Awarded

Bethel Industries Inc., Jersey City, New Jersey, has been awarded a maximum $8,040,600 firm-fixed-price, indefinite-delivery/indefinite-quantity contract for trousers. This was a competitive acquisition with nine responses received. This is a one-year base contract with three one-year option periods. Location of performance is Kentucky, with a May 25, 2023, ordering period end date. Using military services are Army and Air Force. Type of appropriation is fiscal 2022 through 2023 defense working capital funds. The contracting activity is the Defense Logistics Agency Troop Support, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (SPE1C1-22-D-1559).

Target Recalls Children’s Cat & Jack Unicorn Cozy Pajama Sets Due to Burn Hazard

Description: This recall involves a children’s two-piece, long-sleeved top and pant pajama sets. The pajama set is the brand “Cat & Jack” in the “Unicorn Cozy” pattern. The pajama top is black with ivory unicorns and ivory stars with the words “Dream Away” printed in metallic gold lettering. The pajama bottoms are ivory with black unicorns and black stars. The pajama set is 100% polyester and was sold in children’s sizes XS, S, M, L and XL. The product item number is printed on the inside sewn-in side seam label on both the pajama top and pant.

Remedy: Consumers should immediately take the recalled pajama sets away from children and return the pajama sets to any Target store location for a full refund. Consumers who purchased the pajama sets on Target.com can contact Target to receive a prepaid return label to return the pajama set for a full refund. The firm is contacting known purchasers directly regarding the recall.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported

Sold Exclusively At: Target stores nationwide and Target.com from October 2021 through March 2022 for about $15.

Importer(s): Target Corporation, of Minneapolis, Minnesota

Manufactured In: China

Recall number: 22-142

More information and photos HERE.

Joey Clothing Recalls Children’s Robes Due to Burn Hazard

Description: This recall involves Leveret branded children’s robes. The robes are made of cotton and nylon, have an attached hood, cuffed wrists, two functional front pockets and a detachable belt. The robes were sold in children’s sizes 12-18 months through size 14 and in the following colors: black, dark blue, green, gray, navy, pink, purple and white. The sewn-in neck label displays the brand Leveret, the robe’s size, material content, washing instructions and “Made in China.”

Remedy: Consumers should immediately take the recalled robes away from children, stop using them and contact Joey Clothing for a full refund. Consumers who purchased the robes from Amazon.com will be contacted through Amazon’s messaging platform. Consumers who purchased the robes directly from Joey Clothing, Nordstrom Rack and Zulily will be contacted via email.

Consumers must cut the robes in half and send photo proof of the destroyed robes and sewn-in label to receive a $30 refund via email at productrecall@leveret.com. Joey Clothing will refund $35 to consumers who a show a receipt of the full purchase price. Consumers without a receipt will be refunded $30.

Incidents/Injuries: None reported

Sold At: Online at amazon.com, leveret.com, nordstromrack.com and zulily.com from November 2020 through January 2022 for between $30 and $35.

Importer(s): Joey Clothing Inc., of Moonachie, New Jersey

Manufactured In: China

Recall number: 22-145

More information and photos HERE.

2022 Trade Facilitation and Cargo Security Summit Anaheim, California July 18 - 20

U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) has announced that the 2022 Trade Facilitation and Cargo Security Summit will be held July 18-20 at the Hilton Anaheim in Anaheim, California, and virtually via webcast. CBP has combined its annual Trade Symposium and Customs Trade Partnership Against Terrorism (CTPAT) conference to bring you the best of both worlds! There will bethree full days packed with key industry speakers, panel discussions and workshops highlighting the latest requirement updates and best practices for navigating today’s complex supply chain challenges.

Information and registration HERE.